Indian Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Home | About IJNM | Search | Current Issue | Past Issues | Instructions | Ahead of Print | Online submissionLogin 
Indian Journal of Nuclear Medicine
  Editorial Board | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact
Users Online: 430 Print this page  Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size


 
 Table of Contents     
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 58-59  

Increased flurodeoxyglucose uptake observed in the diaphragm and vocal cords on whole body 18F flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computerized tomography scan in a patient with uncontrolled hiccups of unknown origin


1 Department of Radiology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, UH H 141 Newark, NJ 07103, USA
2 Medical Student, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, UH H 141 Newark, NJ 07103, USA

Date of Web Publication22-Aug-2013

Correspondence Address:
Nasrin Ghesani
Department of Radiology, University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, 150 Bergen Street, UH H 141, Newark, NJ 07103
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-3919.116799

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Ghesani N, Jung J. Increased flurodeoxyglucose uptake observed in the diaphragm and vocal cords on whole body 18F flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computerized tomography scan in a patient with uncontrolled hiccups of unknown origin. Indian J Nucl Med 2013;28:58-9

How to cite this URL:
Ghesani N, Jung J. Increased flurodeoxyglucose uptake observed in the diaphragm and vocal cords on whole body 18F flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computerized tomography scan in a patient with uncontrolled hiccups of unknown origin. Indian J Nucl Med [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Dec 16];28:58-9. Available from: http://www.ijnm.in/text.asp?2013/28/1/58/116799

Sir,

The knowledge of physiological 18F flurodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake patterns is essential for interpreting physician to prevent false-positive reporting. Here we present a case of uniform FDG uptake noted in the diaphragm in a 51-year-old man with uncontrolled hiccups of unknown origin for past 10 years. The patient underwent 18F FDG positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (PET/CT) for suspected paraneoplastic syndrome. No FDG avid malignancy was noted, however, increased FDG uptake was noted in the diaphragm, including the crura and in the vocal cords probably from uncontrolled hiccups. The whole body maximum intensity projection images (a) demonstrated increased uptake in the vocal cords (thin arrow), in the diaphragm (hollow arrow) and in the crura (solid arrow). Transaxial PET attenuation corrected image through the neck (b) demonstrate uptake in the vocal cords (thin arrow). Transaxial PET attenuation corrected image through the abdomen (c) demonstrate uptake in the diaphragm (hollow arrow). Coronal PET attenuation corrected image (d) demonstrated the uptake in the crura (solid arrow).[Figure 1]
Figure 1: Images of the 18F flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET)/computerized tomography scan of the 51-year-old male. (a) The whole body maximum intensity projection images demonstrating increased uptake in the vocal cords (thin arrow), in the diaphragm (hollow arrow) and in the crura (solid arrow), (b) Transaxial PET attenuation corrected image through the neck, demonstrating uptake in the vocal cords (thin arrow). (c) Transaxial PET attenuation corrected image through the abdomen, demonstrating uptake in the diaphragm (hollow arrow), (d) Coronal PET attenuation corrected image demonstrating the uptake in the crura (solid arrow)

Click here to view


The role of 18F FDG PET/CT is already described in suspected paraneoplastic syndrome. [1] Increased FDG uptake is observed in the muscles from increased physical activity prior to injection of 18F FDG or during uptake phase that is what seemed to be demonstrated on this scan. [2] A hiccup is an involuntary, intermittent spasmodic contraction of the diaphragm and intercostal muscle that results in a sudden inspiration and ends abruptly with closure of the glottis. [3] The etiology of self-limited and intractable hiccups includes disorders affecting the peripheral and central nervous system, metabolic or drug-mediated factors, infectious, psychogenic and idiopathic causes. This patient has been having hiccups for 10 years and has undergone extensive work-up. No culprit disease entity has been found. Increased FDG uptake is noted in the muscles of mastication from chewing gum 3 h prior to FDG injection. [4] Incidental FDG uptake is observed in the diaphragm, the tongue and vocal cords in a crying child and in the diaphragm in the hyperventilating patient. [5],[6] Increased FDG uptake is also noted in the laryngeal muscles in patients who were talking during the FDG-uptake phase and in patients with recurrent nerve palsy, causing increased uptake in the vocal cord on the contra lateral side. [7] In our patient we observed increased uptake in the diaphragm and in the vocal cords is from increased utilization of these muscles from persistent hiccups.



 
   References Top

1.Matsuhisa A, Toriihara A, Kubota K, Makino T, Mizusawa H, Shibuya H. Utility of F-18 FDG PET/CT in screening for paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Clin Nucl Med 2012;37:39-43.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]    
2.Abouzied MM, Crawford ES, Nabi HA. 18F-FDG imaging: Pitfalls and artifacts. J Nucl Med Technol 2005;33:145-55.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.Loft LM, Ward RF. Hiccups. A case presentation and etiologic review. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1992;118:1115-9.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]    
4.Kawabe J, Higashiyama S, Okamura T, Torii K, Koyama K, Kawamura E, et al. FDG uptake by tongue and muscles of mastication reflecting increased metabolic activity of muscles after chewing gum. Clin Nucl Med 2003;28:220-1.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.Park YH, Baik JH, Ahn MI, Kim JY. FDG uptake in the diaphragm and crura, vocal cords, and base of tongue in a crying child. Clin Nucl Med 2005;30:752-3.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    
6.Chander S, Ergun EL, Zak IT, Zingas AP, Bloom DA, Joyrich RN, et al. Diaphragmatic and crural FDG uptake in hyperventilating patients: A rare pattern important to recognize. Clin Nucl Med 2004;29:296-9.  Back to cited text no. 6
[PUBMED]    
7.Kamel EM, Goerres GW, Burger C, von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in patients with lung cancer: Detection with PET-CT image fusion - Report of six cases. Radiology 2002;224:153-6.  Back to cited text no. 7
[PUBMED]    


    Figures

  [Figure 1]



 

Top
  
 
  Search
 
  
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
    References
    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1083    
    Printed17    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded46    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal